Posted by: oboids | April 12, 2007

Yaoi Alert!

 

desktop01.jpgMy desktop is Yaoi!

Yaoi is a publishing genre, which originated in Japan and often encompasses manga, dōjinshi, anime, and fan art. It focuses on homosexual relationships between male characters and is generally sexually explicit.

Some Westerners consider yaoi to be synonymous with shōnen-ai or BL, which contains similar themes; however by definition this is incorrect, and shōnen-ai material is not sexually explicit. The yaoi phenomenon has spread beyond Japan; yaoi material has also now been published in America and Indonesia, to name a few places.

Yaoi Wallpapers:

Blood, Sex & Yaoi
By: Karinu_Chan

yaoi_by_karinu_chan.jpg

Yami & Yugi
By: Sitriel

yamixyugi_wallpaper_9_by_sitriel.jpg

Naruto & Sasuke
By: Zettalis
fields_of_naruto_by_zetallis.jpg

Spring Kiss
By: FranG

frang-spring-kiss.jpg

Gravitation
By: Tritium3x

gravitation___1024__by_tritium3x.jpg

I am Yours to Command
by: Louvette

louvette-i-am-yours-to-commandpng.jpg

Sanzo’s Vices
By: Jneli

jneli-sanzos-vices.jpg

Together
By: Jneli

jneli-together.jpg

Dreaming of You
By: Laevi

laevi-dreaming-of-you.jpg

Look but don’t Touch Malicekisho

malicekisho-look-but-dont-touch.jpg

Naruto Yaoi
By:Billgoku

naruto_yaoi_wallpaper_by_billgoku.jpg

Sasuke & Kakashi
By: XMonoxideXLullabyX

sasuke_and_kakashi_anbu_by_xmonoxidexlullabyx.jpg

Pronunciation

Strictly speaking, all three vowels should be pronounced in separate morae, yielding a three-mora word, (ya-o-i). However, yaoi is frequently heard as only two syllables, where under acceptable pronunciation produces the phoneme /oi/ with the 「お」 and 「い」 syllabaric characters.

In the United States, it is commonly mispronounced as /jaʊi/ or /jeɪɔɪ/.

Etymology

The English letters form a backronym of the Japanese phrase 「ヤマなし、オチなし、意味なし」 (yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi), often translated into English as, “no climax, no punch line, no meaning,” or as the catchphrase, “No peak, no point, no problem.” It has also been rather affectionately termed “Yamete! Oshiri ga itai!” or “Stop! My butt hurts!” in English.

The term appears to have been originally used in Japan, perhaps as early as the 1970s, to describe any doujinshi that was a bizarre, playful parody; however, it has come to refer solely to sexually explicit male-male homosexual material. Yaoi is not a common term in Japanese; it is specific to the otaku subculture.

Usage

Usage of the term yaoi varies. Some purists insist that it should only be applied to doujinshi, while others claim it refers only to material printed by Japanese publishers who specialize in yaoi. The majority of fans, however, apply the term to any of a broad range of male-male sexually-themed manga and anime.

Though yaoi is sometimes used to refer to any male homosexual content in film and print media, particularly in works created by females, that is generally considered a misuse of the term. Professional Japanese artists, such as Kodaka Kazuma, are careful to distinguish their works as “yaoi,” rather than “gay,” when describing them to English-speaking audiences.

Seme and uke

The two participants in a yaoi relationship are often referred to as seme (“attacker”) and uke (“receiver”). Although these terms originated in martial arts, they have apparently been used in a sexual context for centuries and do not carry any degrading connotations. Seme derives from the Japanese verb semeru (“to attack”) and uke from the Japanese verb ukeru (“to receive”). Though gay males are often referred to in English as “tops” or “bottoms,” seme and uke are more nearly analogous to “pitcher” and “catcher.”

The seme is often depicted as the stereotypical male of anime and manga culture: restrained, physically powerful, and/or protective. The seme usually has a stronger chin, shorter hair, smaller eyes, and a more masculine demeanor than the uke. The seme usually pursues the uke.

The uke is usually more androgynous or effeminate in appearance and demeanor and is often smaller and sometimes unrealistically girlish in behavior.

Though these stereotypes are common, not all works adhere to them. For example, some of the anthologies published by Be X Boy feature stories on themes such as “younger seme” or “reversibles.” The “height rule,” the implication that greater height confers greater power, is also sometimes broken.

While most earlier yaoi depicted both seme and uke partners as slightly effeminate, there has been an uprise of “muscle yaoi,” in which adult men are portrayed as more masculine and strongly muscled. Yaoi of this kind is referred to in fan communities as “bara” after Barazoku, a now-defunct Japanese gay mens magazine often known for pictures of men with muscle tone. Yaoi of the former kind is now referred to as “bishie” within fan communities, after the word bishonen, a term for effeminate and/or andgrogynous “pretty boys” in anime and manga.

More of Yaoi in Wikipedia


Responses

  1. Hello there. :d Glad to find a fellow yaoi fan on the net.😀

  2. Hello there😀. Glad to find a fellow yaoi fan on the net.


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